Buttery Pecan and Vanilla Shortbread

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I’ve  be deliberating what to do with some pecans I had in the cupboard and the last of my light brown sugar I bought in Mauritius, until I spotted the hubby eyeing up the shortbread at a local food festival we went to yesterday. The hubby is super supportive of all my wild career ideas and adventures, so I just feel he deserves a treat or two, and with that in mind I’ve baked and my Buttery Pecan and Vanilla Shortbread is ready to be devoured.

If you would like to treat someone you love with these delicious treats here’s the recipe

Ingredients

  • 225g unsalted butter, softened
  • 110g light brown sugar, plus extra for dusting
  • 175g plain flour
  • 50g toasted pecans, ground
  • 110g cornflour
  • 1 vanilla pod, seeds
    Pinch of salt

Method

In a bowl cream together the sugar, vanilla and butter until fluffy and pale.

Sieve the cornflour and plain four together, add the ground pecans and salt, combine with the butter mixture until a soft dough is formed.

Roll out the dough between two sheets of cling film to a desired thickness. I attempted to roll to 3 cm but the dough was soft, I got a bit giddy and ended up with wonky levels. (A tip here would be to chill the dough in the fridge for 10 minutes to firm up the dough.)

Once rolled out cut in your desired shapes and place on a lined baking sheet.

Place in the. fridge to chill for 30 mins.

Preheat the oven to 170c/160c fan

Place the shortbread trays in the oven and bake for 20 mins or until lightly golden, remove from the oven and leave to cool.

Sprinkle with a little sugar and enjoy the buttery, crumbly texture.

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Patrick Ah-Fat’s Peking Duck

This post started with a long trip to the island of Mauritius, where my late father was born and where I had not been for 30 years. Mauritius for those that don’t know is a very small but wonderful tropical island in the Indian Ocean, with. a wealth of cultural influences from African, Indian and Chinese, which  create a fantastic island vibe of colours, flavours and traditions known as Creole.

The image below shows one of the first views of the island as you fly in, the cove is Grand Baie in the north, which is next to our family favourite beach of Pereybere. I remember the first time I visited the island and saw the view from the plane,  the vivid blue green from the sea blew me away even at the age of 13. I was relieved when I returned that the view was just as impressive and the colours were still as fresh as the ones in my memory.

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View from the sky Grand Baie, Mauritius – no photo editing

While visiting the Island my husband and I caught up with some of the family, who are still living in Post Louis. The visit was great as we got to see the family home and catch up on family chat, plus we  meet a new addition to the Ah-Fat family,  I wonder if you can guess which one.

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We ended up going out for dinner with the cousins at their favourite Chinese restaurant, which was amazing and they had chosen a really special menu for the evening. After dinner we drove past the family shop “Magasin Ah-Fat” which has the largest sign ever !!!! Apparently there was a large sign but Uncle thought it would fall down and hit someone, so it  was removed and the small sign left. No wonder I couldn’t find the shop when I went looking for it on my own, I even walked passed it. The shop has been established for 50 + years and is going strong, originally selling all types of sports equipment and re stringing rackets by hand themselves, now the shop just specialises in  fishing tackle and is well know on the island. You can find the shop next to the main entrance by the Alooda stall in the Market (I highly recommend the Alooda if you are there).

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Me  finally at Magasin Ah-Fat , Port Louis, Mauritius 

When I was talking with the cousins about not having dad’s recipes,  it transpired they had the recipe of my dad’s Peking Duck.  I though this recipe had been lost forever, as  my sister and I did not get my dad to write down any of his dishes before he died  and something we regret not doing. My dad was famed for this recipe and one that I had seen prepared in various stages but not prepared myself. It was a memorable process as Dad always prepared the duck by hanging it to dry in the garage and the a mount of times I walked into the duck without paying much attention in the dark was countless, not brilliant as at the time I was a veggie, you can just imagine the grumbles.  I was so pleased to have this recipe given to me, it has been 14 years since my dad died and it just feels like I’ve been given a little gift to remind myself that my dad is still around.

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My dad  back in the 80’s – Dr. Lim Niam Chow Ah-fat aka Patrick Ah-fat

Patrick Ah-Fat’s Peking Duck

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Patrick Ah-Fat’s Peking Duck

Prep time: 24hrs

Cooking time: 1hr

 Serves 3-4

Ingredients: 

  • 1 x 1.3kg Duck, whole
  • 1 tbsp salt, to rub onto the duck

Spice rub:

  • 1 heaped tsp five spice powder
  • 1 tsp salt

Duck glaze:

  • 2 tbsp water
  • 2 tbsp vinegar
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp rum, I used green island spice rum
  • 1/2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 pinch of yellow food colouring

Method:

Place the duck on a rack over a roasting tin and prick the skin with a sharp knife, this will allow the fat to leech out during the cooking process.

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The duck

Pour three kettles of boiling water over the duck, this will tighten the skin and start to render the fat, discard the water each time.

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Tightening the duck skin with boiling water

Drain the duck and pat dry with some kitchen roll.

Mix the five spice powder and 1tsp salt in pan and heat lightly over low flame, once the aroma starts  remove from the heat.

Rub the cavity of the duck with the spice rub and seal up the cavity with a cocktail stick.

Now to make the glaze, I used Green Island spiced rum and brown sugar I brought back from Mauritius as a nod to my dad.

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Green Island rum 

In a small saucepan mix the water, vinegar, honey, rum, sugar and food colouring, bring to boil. Remove glaze from heat and pour over duck.

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Glazing the duck

Collect the glaze and place back in the saucepan, boil again and pour over duck. Then throw away the remaining glaze.

Rub salt all over duck, hang and leave to dry overnight. I did this in my fridge as it was too warn to hang in the utility.

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Remove the duck from where it is hanging, place on a rack over a roasting tray and pat try with some kitchen roll to remove any moisture sitting on the skin.

Pre heat the oven to 180c fan, cook for 30 mins on side make sure each is a deep brown.

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Ta Da the roasted duck.

Leave the duck to rest for 10 minutes before slicing and remember to pour over the juices.

Serve with rice pancakes, hoisin, sauce, spring onions, carrots and cucumber.

I also served the duck with rice, and a chilli and garlic stir fry kale with black sesame seeds. don’t forget to pour the duck gravy over your rice.

I hope you give this recipe a try and enjoy as much as I did. I can also confirm that I did  my dad’s recipe justice. The duck’s spicing was just right, the skin was tasty and the meat was moist and succulent.

Happy eating.

 

 

Baked smoked chipotle chilli marinated sheeps milk feta, with peperonata on bruschetta

I’ve been out of action in the kitchen for a little while as I’ve been ill, away on vacation and at the moment I’m in recovery mode from abdominal surgery. Yesterday was the first day that I was able to make it in the kitchen and cook, mainly because the husband was eating out and I had to fend for myself. Luckily for me I had a grocery delivery earlier in the day and had all my favourite ingredients to make baked smoked chipotle chilli marinated sheeps milk feta, with peperonata on bruschetta.

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baked smoked chipotle chilli marinated sheeps milk feta, with peperonata on bruschetta

This dish is so simple to make and can be eaten at lunch or dinner, warm or cold, alone or in company, its a summery dish with all the right elements: salty, sweet, savoury, tart, creamy, bitter and spicy, I guess thats what’s called umami.

My favourite part of this dish is the feta, but it needs to be a pure sheep milk or a sheep and goats milk mix as I find that it has a sharper cleaner flavour than ones that contain cows milk. The creaminess of the feta next to the warm smokey heat of the chipotle chilli for me is like a marriage made in heaven and the sort of food that I can’t stop going back to and nibbling on while waiting for the rest of the elements of the dish to finish cooking.

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Baked smoked chipotle chilli marinated sheeps milk feta

To make this  dish you will need the following

Ingredients 

For the feta 

1 x 250g block of sheep milk feta

2 large teaspoon of smoked chipotle chilli paste

For the bruschetta 

slices of good quality fresh white bread

1 garlic clove

olive oil

salt

sprinkle of mixed herbs

For the peperonata

6  Ramiro peppers, deseeded and sliced

1 x large red onion, thinly sliced

2 x plum tomatoes, deseeded and roughly chopped

1 large garlic clove, chopped

1 tsp salt

1 tbsp olive oil

Aged balsamic vinegar for dressing.

Method: 

Heat the oven to 170c

Place the feta in a heat proof bowl, spread the chipotle chilli paste over the feta, and leave to marinate.

In a roasting tray place all the ingredients for the peperonata, give it a mix to ensure all the ingredients are seasoned and coated in the olive oil.  Place in the preheated oven for 35 minutes.

When the pepronata has been in the oven for 35 minutes, give it a little stir and place the  marinated feta in the oven as well and bake for 25 minutes.

Prepare the bruschetta by rubbing the bread with the garlic clove, place on a baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil, season with salt and mixed herbs, and place in oven for 10 minutes or until golden.

Remove the peperonata, feta and bruschetta from the oven, assemble on the plate, dress with balsamic vinegar and serve.

Enjoy and eat well.

 

 

 

 

Meen Pollichathu – Fish in Banana Leaf

 

This dish Meen Pollichathu (Fish cooked in Banana Leaf) was taught to me by good friend Divya in Chendamangalam, Kerala. This is a deliciously spicy dish that’s great served with rice or just with a parotta and will impress your guests for sure.

Traditionally this dish uses a fish that is local to the fresh waters of Kerala called Karimeen, which is not readily available in the UK so I have opted for sea bream but grey mullet or snapper lends itself well.

The banana leaves are a really important element in this dish as not only does it hold the whole dish together it imparts a flavour and keeps the fish moist and succulent.

Meen Pollichathu – Fish in Banana Leaf

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Serves: 2

Prep time: 30 minutes

Cooking time:  30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 large whole sea bream, scaled and gutted
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2-inch fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 5 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 5 small shallots
  • 2 fresh green finger chillies
  • 1tsp ground black pepper
  • 2 tsp chilli powder
  • 3 tsp coconut vinegar
  • 2 large tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 onion sliced
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 sprigs of curry leaves
  • 1 banana leaf, enough to wrap the fish twice.

Method

Prep the banana leaf by trimming into sheets to wrap the fish, taking care to remove the central spine of the leaf.  Wash in water, dry the leaves and run the leaves over a flame, this seal the leaves, making them more pliable.

Slash the fish and rub with 1tsp salt and ½ tsp turmeric.

In a wok or frying pan heat the coconut oil and fry the fish until sealed.

To make the masala place the ginger, garlic, shallots, fresh chilli green, chilli powder, pepper, salt and coconut vinegar in a masala grinder and grind until smooth.

Coat the inside and outside of the fish in all the masala, and leave to marinade for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes over lap the banana leaf sheets in a cross shape, place half the tomatoes, curry leaves and onion on top of the leaves.

Place the masala marinated fish on top of the leaves, add the remaining curry leaves, slices of onions and tomatoes, and wrap the fish in the leaves securing with a cocktail stick.

In a hot wok, add a little coconut oil and place the fish parcels in the wok frying for 10 minutes on each side.

Serve with steamed rice or parotta with wedges of limes.

Warm Lebanese spiced roasted butternut and sweet potato salad with beluga lentils and pomegranate

Over the last week I’ve been feeling really sick with a cold resulting in me feeling really lethargic and irritable, everything I’ve eaten has not satisfied me in the slightest not even soup and being on a diet hasn’t helped much either.

I was determined that lunch today would be full of the things I love, the dish served was a delicious warm Lebanese spiced roasted butternut and sweet potato salad with beluga lentils and pomegranate. I was really pleased with the results as I could actually taste all the spicing and flavours for the first time in days, the road to discovery is definitely in sight.  I guess eating bright vibrant food helps to rebuild the soul too.

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Warm Lebanese spiced roasted butternut and sweet potato salad with beluga lentils and pomegranate

Prep 15 minutes

Cooking time 1hr

Serves 2

Ingredients

For roasting 

1 small sweet potato, peeled and chopped into cubes

1/4 butternut squash, peeled and chopped into cubes

2 romanesco peppers, cut in half

1 tbsp Lebanese spice blend ( equal quantities of ground: cinnamon, clove, ginger, nutmeg, all spice, coriander)

1 tbsp olive oil

1tsp sea salt

For the salad

1 small pomegranate, de-seeded + juice

10 on the vine cherry tomatoes, quartered

1/4 portion cucumber, chopped into small cubes

mixed lettuce leaves

125g ready to eat beluga lentils

1tsp olive oil

sea salt, to season

plack pepper, to season

Method

Pre heat the oven to 180c

In a tray add all the ingredients for roasting except for the peppers, combine the ingredients and roast for 40 minutes.

While the sweet potatoes and butternut squash are roasting prepare the rest of the salad ingredients and combine in a bowl.

Oil the peppers and add to the roasting pan for 20minutes.

Remove the peppers, sweet potatoes and butternut squash from the oven after 20 minutes.

Peel the skin from the peppers and slice into strips, add the peppers, butternut squash and sweet potatoes to the rest of the salad ingredients, combine and serve.

A great addition to this dish would be toasted walnuts…… wish I thought of that before i ate it !

 

judion butterbean, chorizo, chicken and piquillo pepper stew

 

 

After what seems like a never ending two weeks of festive celebrations and 6 months of eating very very very little meat, its time to consider what would I like to achieve food wise in 2017.

Over the last 6 months I’ve eaten meat 4 times and had fish 5 times, its always good to review what we eat and if we are actually enjoying the food that we eat. In the summer I did this, as I was not enjoying the taste or the texture of meat, so I decided to “go veggie” which was fairly easy decision for me as my food business at the time was producing vegan food and I’d previously been veggie for 7 years. The news of giving up meat and fish again was received with a mixed bag of reactions, the hubby was supportive and decided that he would join me but didn’t want the label of “vegetarian” as he had just decided to give up eating meat and fish no take on the principles, my mother went into panic mode but calmed down once I reminded that when I visit, I cook anyway. Some friends are meat free, which helped and others were supportive but fearful of my vegetable and pulse loving ways.

I have enjoyed being challenged in my approach to cooking and have regained a love for cauliflower, which I wouldn’t eat at all for the last 12 years but I have to admit I have missed meat and fish. I also have found it incredibly difficult to get decent quality vegetarian food when out at restaurants and also being limited with the options on offer. Maybe if I lived nearer to larger cities I’d have more options available, sadly I don’t and local restaurants are not as innovative in their approach to food as I’d like.

So putting aside my justifications for returning back to eating meat, the hubby and I celebrated New Years Eve with Persian Roast Guinea Fowl with roast vegetables and gravy……….oh my word I HAVE MISSED meat gravy, the meat was ok but the gravy was awesome! As my love for meat gravy had been rekindled, I decided to make a dish I haven’t made in some time mainly due to lack of access to my favourite Spanish products. I was lucky this Christmas as the hubby organised a little order from Brindisa, so it was all systems go for my judion butterbean, chorizo, chicken and piquillo pepper stew. I would like to encourage you to make this dish using the Spanish ingredients listed as they add so much to the dish and provide the most delicious deep flavour that just satisfies the soul.

I hope you enjoy and Happy New Year.

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Judion butterbean, chorizo, chicken and piquillo pepper stew

Prep: 15 minutes

Cooking: 50 mins approx.

Ingredients 

  • 1 660mg jar judion butter beans
  • 150g picante cooking chorizo, diced
  • 2 large red onion, sliced
  • 2 large chicken breasts, diced
  • 2 tbsp pimiento choricero (nora pepper) paste
  • 1/2 tin piquillo pepper strips
  • 4 plum tomatoes, deseeded and chopped
  • chicken stock 300ml
  • 2 heaped tsp smoked paprika
  • 3 large garlic cloves, crushed
  • salt and pepper
  • 140ml red wine, I used a Marcus de Caceres Rioja
  • 2 tbsp tomato puree
  • 2tbps fresh thyme, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley, finely chopped

Method

Prep all the ingredients in advance

Over a medium heat place a pan, I like to use a cast iron pan for this recipe but any heavy bottomed pan will do.

Add the chorizo to the dry pan and start to fry, there is no need for oil, as the chorizo will have enough for the dish. Once the oil from the chorizo has come out add the onions and fry until soft.

Add the garlic, pimiento choricero paste, tomato puree, parsley, thyme and smoked paprika to the pan and cook for approximately 3 minutes, if the mixture starts to stick to the base of the pan add a little water and reduced the head slightly.

Add the chicken and seal in the spice, onion and chorizo mix

Then add the tomatoes, cook for a further 3 minutes

When the tomatoes have cooked down add the butter beans, piquillo peppers and red wine, combine all the ingredients in the pan and cook for a further 5 minutes before adding salt, pepper to season and the chicken stock.

Cook for 20 -25 minutes over a low heat

Check the seasoning and serve with some decent sourdough.

 Enjoy

 

clementine, chocolate, and date m’hencha…an alternative christmas treat.

 

As I’m twiddling my thumbs until I start my new job next week, I’ve been looking at what ingredients I’ve got hanging about the kitchen and what deliciousness I can make. I first came across a recipe for M’hencha a couple of years ago but didn’t make it, although I was interested in making one at some point. Then this year I bought a date and orange one, it was delicious, the m’hencha was just on another level and for the last couple of months it’s been at the back of my mind that I need to make one. So I did and it turns out it’s really easy to make, which could be a little dangerous.

The dish served today is a spiced clementine, date and chocolate m’hencha, otherwise known as a snake cake from morocco. This M’hencha is a mix of nuts, dates, spices, and chocolate encased is crisp phyllo pastry, dusted with icing sugar and cinnamon. I’m really pleased with my first attempt and think it makes a rather nice alternative to a mince pie or piece of Christmas cake. I’ll definitely be making this later in the month for the festivities and I hope you do too.

Clementine, Chocolate and Date M'hencha
clementine, chocolate and date m’hencha

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 35-40 minutes

Serves: 8

Ingredients:

  • 12 sheets phyllo pastry
  • 150ml clementine juice
  • Zest of 4 clementines
  • 200g date paste
  • 165g almonds
  • 50g pistachios, shelled
  • 40g cocoa powder
  • 100g vanilla sugar
  • 80g icing sugar
  • 1 egg white
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon, ground
  • 1/2 tsp green cardamom, ground
  • 1/4 tsp cloves, ground
  • 1 tsp orange blossom water
  • 100g unsalted butter, melted

Decoration

  • 2 tsp icing sugar
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon, ground

Method:

Preheat the oven to 180c

Grease and line a 10-inch cake tin

In a food processor place the clementine juice, zest, almonds, pistachios, cocoa powder,  date paste, vanilla sugar, icing sugar, egg white, cinnamon, cardamom, cloves and orange blossom water, pulse the mixture to get a textured paste and place in a bowl.

To assemble the pastry, melt the butter and lay out a large length of cling wrap.

Unwrap the phyllo pastry, placing 4 sheets each over lapping short ends on top of the cling wrap.

Using a pastry brush work quickly and brush the pastry with the melted butter, ensure you brush between the over lapping edges. Then place a sheet of pastry over each of the buttered layer and repeat with the rest of the phyllo, making sure the top layer is also buttered.

Take the m’hencha filling; make a line of filling along the longest edge of the pastry nearest to you.

Using the cling wrap to help you start to turn the edge of the pastry over the filling and continue to roll, remove the cling film and discard.

Ensure the pastry seam is on the underside of the rolled pastry, brush with the remaining butter and gently coil the pastry around itself, at the end tuck the pastry slightly under the coil, place in the cake tin and bake in the oven for 35-40 minutes or until golden.

Once cooked, remove from the oven and cool in the tin.

When cooled, remove from the tin and dust with the icing sugar and cinnamon. Serve on its own or with some whipped cream and a mint tea.